Our Idaho and Utah State Parks

We really want to love the state parks. From experience, we have learned to stay out of them on the weekends. That is when everybody loads up all the kids, the dogs, the bikes, all their stuff, and goes “camping.” Air conditioners in tents, flat screen TVs; stereo systems; we’ve seen some amazing sights on the weekends in the state parks. Now that the summer is over and school back in session, they are delightful and quiet and deserted during the week. With good places for the kitties to go on safari too.

After we finally left Oregon, we found a state park in Glenns Ferry, Idaho where three islands in the Snake River made for an easier crossing for folks traveling the Oregon Trail in the 1840s and ’50s. From some of the lore in the exhibit, it still wasn’t exactly an easy crossing. They waited for the river to be at its lowest, in July and August. Then they put the women on the tallest horses to ride across. The horses were still up to their necks in water. The carts and mules had a rougher time. One account told of the cart tipping over with the mule team upside down in the river. Only fast action cutting the reins kept the mules from drowning. You lose your mules in that part of Idaho, along with your supplies and you are toast.

It was here that I started getting up earlier so I could photograph the sunrise.

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We were parked right on the Snake River.
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We stayed at Three Island for four nights. then moved on to Steineker Lake State Park. Along the way we passed Starvation Reservoir.
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Steineker Lake was really low, I walked down to the water’s edge and it looked like it could easily have been eighty feet to the high water mark.
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Our view from the bus:
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Fall is coming. From here we are heading to Grand Junction, Colorado to visit our friends Ramona and Ted. Captain Ted is the one who taught us to drive the bus about five years ago. Time to catch up with our good friends.

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2 comments on “Our Idaho and Utah State Parks

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